• Sharon Hayes, Revolutionary love: I am your worst fear, I am your best fantasy in See you at the barricades, 2008.

  • Guerilla Girls posters, See you at the barricades, 30 May – 29 November 2015, AGNSW.

  • Guerilla Girls posters, See you at the barricades, 30 May – 29 November 2015, AGNSW.

  • Sharon Hayes, Revolutionary love: I am your worst fear, I am your best fantasy in See you at the barricades, 2008.

  • Elvis Richardson, The Pool of Artists in The CoUNTess Report, http://www.thecountessreport.com.au/, 2014.

40th Anniversary Exhibitions

Contemporary Art and Feminism - Future Feminist Archive
“Future Feminist Archive explores the generative potential of the archive as idea and material phenomenon. It is both a year-long series of exhibitions, events and symposia hosted by SCA’s Contemporary Art and Feminism research cluster to commemorate the 40th anniversary of International Women’s Day, and an exhibition at SCA Galleries in March.”
https://sydney.edu.au/sca/docs/research/contemporary-art-feminism/Future_web_singlepg.pdf
^All words taken from the document

Artists Talks: Girls at the Tin Sheds: Sydney Feminist Posters 1975–90
“A selection of posters chiefly from University Collections featuring the women artists and poster-makers who worked at the Tin Sheds, a hothouse for social and political debates. From the mid- seventies feminism, Aboriginal rights and the environmental movement galvanised the Tin Sheds, most visible in the explosion of dazzling and provocative posters. Some were collectively produced, others designed by artists such as Jean Clarkson, Pam Debenham, Jan Fieldsend, Angela Gee, Therese Kenyon, Leonie Lane, Jan Mackay, Marie McMahon, Avril Quaill, Toni Robertson, Yanni Stumbles and Sheona White. This display of historic posters coincides with the 40th anniversary of International Women's Year.

Curated by Katie Yuill

Supported by the Chancellor's Committee, The University of Sydney”
http://sydney.edu.au/museums/exhibitions-events/girls-sheds.shtml
^ All words from this website

XAP Alder + Mini Graff (PDF on XAP web)
“On Friday 6 March at 6pm Julie Ewington opens an exhibition by Alison Alder and Mini Graff, 'Some Posters / Local Positions' for Future Feminist Archive presented by Contemporary Art and Feminism for the 40th Anniversary of International Women’s Year.
Talks by Mini Graff and Charles Pickett, curator and historian, Saturday 21 March.
Exhibition dates: 6 March to Saturday 18 April 2015.
The artists have created new works about the struggle by a small public housing community in Millers Point and The Rocks to save their homes. A former maritime community’s battle against a cruel upheaval and state social cleansing has created a national scandal and is emblematic of the real-life impacts of the housing affordability crisis and its disproportionate impact on the aged, single women (estimated at over 60%) and single parent families as smaller inner-city housing estates are now high land value areas.”
http://crossart.com.au/archive/272-some-posters-positions-for-future-feminist-archive
^All words from this website

Cross Art Books notes on FFA
http://www.abebooks.com/servlet/BookDetailsPL?bi=16466841234&searchurl=isbn%3D9781921558061%26sortby%3D17%26n%3D100121503

Parramatta Road Gallery – The Parramatta Female Factory Memory Project
http://www.pffpmemoryproject.org/events.php - no mention of a 2015 event??

Plimsoll Gallery Tasmania – Mad Women in The Attic
“MAD WOMEN IN THE ATTIC?
A Feminist Revisioning of the Archive
To coincide with the 40th anniversary of International Women’s Year and the 125th anniversary of the University of Tasmania, the Plimsoll Gallery’s exhibition, Mad women in the attic? Will reprise the significant contributions by great female artists and writers to the Tasmanian College of the Arts public program over three decades.
A rich set of themes emerges from these women’s art: domestic relations, sexual politics, activism, queer and racial politics, empowerment, the gaze, portraiture, self-portraiture and performance – the body as site of identity, vulnerability, power, intimacy, transgression, subversion, abjection, violation and masquerade. The curators, Mary Scott and Maria Kunda, have invited a selection of Tasmanian and international artists and writers to reflect upon and amplify this storehouse of female expression to revise and re-envision these themes.
Curators: Mary Scott and Maria Kunda
Presented by The Plimsoll Gallery, Tasmanian College of the Arts (University of Tasmania)”
http://www.tendays.org.au/event/mad-women-attic/
^All words taken from this website

Box Copy Brisbane DAAO Event
“Saturday 20 June 10am – 1pm
Come along on Saturday 20th June for a special workshop with Gillian Fuller from Design and Art Australia Online (DAAO).
DAAO is the largest free research database on Australian art and design. It is connected with cultural datasets around the world and syndicates to the National Library of Australia’s Trove service. Adding records to DAAO means your information will be preserved, enhanced and, most importantly, freely accessible to all.
At Boxcopy we will be focusing on building profiles of Queensland artists, so choose an artist to champion and join us for the datasprint. Places are limited – email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. to register and receive further information about the day.”
https://boxcopy.org/2015/06/17/workshop-design-and-art-australia-online-boxcopy/
^All words taken from this website

Photography Meets Feminism, Monash
“PHOTOGRAPHY MEETS FEMINISM: Australian women photographers 1970s–80s
18 October 2014 to 7 December 2014
During this period of the late twentieth century, photography helped feminism and feminism helped photography. On the one hand, feminists used the highly informative and accessible medium of photography to raise awareness of critical social issues. On the other hand, photographic artists embraced feminist themes as a way of making their practice less esoteric and more engaged with contemporary life. This productive exchange between feminism and photography fostered a range of technical innovations and critical frameworks that radically transformed the direction of visual culture in Australia.
PHOTOGRAPHY MEETS FEMINISM: Australian women photographers 1970s–80s will feature vintage prints of important photographs, many of which have not been seen for decades.
Artists in the exhibition include: Micky ALLAN, Pat BRASSINGTON, Virginia COVENTRY, Sandy EDWARDS, Anne FERRAN, Sue FORD, Christine GODDEN, Helen GRACE, Janina GREEN, Fiona HALL, Ponch HAWKES, Carol JERREMS, Merryle JOHNSON, Ruth MADDISON, Julie RRAP, Robyn STACEY”
http://www.mga.org.au/exhibition/view/exhibition/162
^All words taken from this website